One Foot in Yesterday, One Foot in Tomorrow, Pissing on Today and Blue Zone Lesson # 5

Fitness fits the header “One foot in yesterday, one foot in tomorrow, pissing on today”. That’s a quote attributed to Micheal J. Fox. When I spend my mental powers looking at my past physical condition, pondering how it runs the range from superhuman with a rich sports history to being part of the great American Obesity Epidemic. My dwelling here among my past glories and misadventures can be very hazardous to my health as it chronicles a trip downhill to become part of the great collection of American obese persons and personally unhealthy. What we do today affects our physical and mental outlook on the future.  A workout today makes all the bodily functions crank up so that the workout becomes a “must-do” activity. Next, the fuel supply for the body to run itself may be in 3 patterns. It can draw on stored fuel to run or run on the current source or store the fuel for the future. What you eat today is extremely important, it’s the fuel source. A huge percentage of Americans are in a state of obesity, They are storing fuel (fat cells), and the confusion to fix that is incredible. You can fix yourself. Change your thinking from One foot in yesterday, one foot in tomorrow, and pissing on today to What is the plan for fitness and long life today? If you keep doing and eating what you are doing and eating, you will keep getting what you are getting or worse. The future according to an insurance accuracy table is grim. The odds of death double every 8 years according to Dr. Andrew Steel in his book Ageless, The New Science of Getting Older Without Getting old.

Karma affcts everything

How do we optimize our life with this process of progessive degeneration called aging always on the march? Where can we end up? What is the goal?

The goal could be just aesthetic. You know, to look good in your clothes. That’s shallow. It could be to gain or maintain strength to combat every one of life’s challenges. You have to face some of those challenges in your head, pushups can’t fix all that. It could be to live a long time, I like that. The drawback is ill health and all the things that go with that plus the loss of friends. 

How do we stay healthy or at least recover quickly from our health challenges until the end of this adventure? The Key is Gratitude and Service to our fellow travelers on this planet. This will give purpose to our health. That is the motivator. We must pray and meditate daily. We must work out daily. We must eat right daily. All this so we can be of service. What we do or don’t do daily is the measure of the resulting Karma that will get our attention. We can get another turn if we fail for a day, but……There are billions of lives at stake. Now and in the future.

We want to reach old age without a prolonged period of ill health. That is the goal. We want to come to the end and see the result of a life well-lived.

A recent post from the Mayo Clinic said that in post-Covid-19 America more people are looking at dieting as a way to be healthier for their immune system more than just cutting the quarantine weight gain. I’m encouraged by that news.

Here is a Link to a basic core set of exercises

https://blog.myfitnesspal.com/5-day-core-workout-guide/

Blue Zone Lesson #5

The Blue Zones

9 Lessons For Living Longer

From the people who’ve lived the longest

by Dan Buettner

This is not meant to be a book review, but a chance to impart some great information that we all need to know.

“Life expectancy of an American born today averages 78.2 years. But this year, over 70,000 Americans have reached their 100 birthday.”

Dan Buettner teamed up with National Geographic to find the world’s longest-lived people and study them. They found pockets of people around the world with the highest life expectancy, or with the highest proportions of people to reach age 100.

The 5 places are:

Barbagia region of Sardinia-mountainous highlands

Ikaria, Greece-Aegean Island

Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica

Seventh Day Adventist-around Loma Linda, California

Okinawa, Japan-Island area.

They put together medical researchers, anthropologists,

Demographers, and epidemiologists to search for evidence-based common denominators. They found nine lifestyle and diet habits .

Here is the first Lifestyle habit:

1. Move Naturally.

“The world’s longest-lived people don’t pump iron, run marathons or join gyms. Instead, they live in environments that constantly nudge them into moving without thinking about it. They grow gardens and don’t have mechanical conveniences for house and yard work.”

How do I incorporate this into my life?

“Inconvenience Yourself”

“Have fun, Keep moving’

“Walk”

2. Purpose.

“The Okinawans call it ‘Ikigai’ and the Nicoyans call it ‘plan de vida;’for both it translates to ‘why I wake up in the morning.’ Knowing your sense of purpose is worth up to seven years of extra life expectancy.”

In his book, The author says to take time to see the big picture. For me, I know some days are going to not be pain free. Having a purpose helps me push the pain and strain aside.

#3. Down shift

“Even people in the Blue Zones experience stress. Stress leads to chronic inflammation, associated with every major age-related disease. What the world’s longest-lived people have that we don’t are routines to shed that stress. Okinawans take a few moments each day to remember their ancestors, Adventists pray, Ikarians take a nap and Sardinians do happy hour.”

#4. 80% Rule

“‘Hara hachi bu’ -the Okinawan, 2500-year old Confucian mantra said before meals reminds them to stop eating when their stomachs are 80% full. The 20% gap between not being hungry and feeling full could be the difference between losing weight or gaining it. People in the blue zones eat their smallest meal in the late afternoon or early evening and then they don’teat any more the rest of the day.”

#5. Plant Slant

“Beans, including fava, black, soy and lentils, are the cornerstone of most centenarian diets. Meat–mostly pork–is eaten on average only five times per month. Serving sizes are 3-4 oz., about the size of a deck of cards.”

That’s #5; there are 4 lessons to go.

This blog is a little too preachy, but we all need a kick in the butt occasionally.

Be Healthy,

Coach Brown

Spring Break, Atrophy, and Blue Zone Lesson # 4

Spring

Las Vegas History, Open to the Public

Spring break, Earth day, Ramadan, Easter, Passover, May day: you have got to fit in some kind of spring thing. I got a week and went to Guaymas, Sonora, Mexico. It was not my first choice but I had a great time. Fishing, hiking, snorkeling, kayaking, things that make a vacation great, were all accomplished in a weeks’ fun packed adventure.

2 on 1 leader was lunch
My snorkel spot
Empty beach from the lookout

I made a choice to enjoy the food (and fresh fish) while in pursuit of salad and vegetables in the Mexican cuisine. It proved a tough task. I have proof that it is real, check out this tuna salad. This is seared crusted fresh tuna on a bed of goodness.

Tuna Dinner

Guaymas and its sister resort San Carlos is on the mainland side of the Gulf of California. It has beaches and cliffs and an old world feel to the town. It should also be noted that this is not an expensive place.

This sign means you are close to nowhere

Mister, I’m not doing nothing wrong.

This, unfortunately, is a quote from one of my students. We really need to address this. I was encouraging a small group of 4 or 5 P.E. boys to get into motion during our class. The boys were standing around talking to each other or texting into the cosmos. This whole scenario is way too common. The statement my student made has so many things wrong with it. It is easy to correct the English and understand its origin. “Mister”, amazingly, is the way my students address all teachers; like saying  “Sir” or “Coach”. I don’t know where it came from, but it is acceptable. Then you need to consider that the group is all English, as a Second Language, learners. The wording was not meant to be offensive, it just needs work. I correct what I can and look for understanding.

Next is the real problem, the thinking. This thinking is a flaw most of us share. It is the thinking of most every non-action and couch-potato non-move. If I am not doing anything wrong then it must be okay. In the mind of a 10th grade boy, this is logic. We, adults, have to know and do better.

Physically, “not doing anything” leads to sickness and early death. You are acquainted with atrophy. The use it or lose it concept. We must move to maintain or obtain good health. All of the body processes depend on movement. Spiritually and intellectually we must seek or we become second class people. Here is an old saying I learned from a colleague, “When you are green you grow and when you are ripe you rot.”

Spiritually I must continue to seek or the universe will stagnate for me and I will lose my connection to it. The Noble Path includes Right Conduct and Right Effort…seek. 

Intellectually I must continue to use my thoughts to generate a successful today, I don’t want to not lose the ability to process all sets of events and topics of the day . The negative effect of this is to see the world grow smaller and smaller until you are not part of it.

Here is a link to story about my friend Hans:

If you are interested in learning about Intermitant Fasting or fighting type II Diabetes go check out The Ultimate Health Podcast #467 with Dr. Jason Fong. You watch or just listen.

https://video.link/w/Lbzod
Not a link, just information

THE Blue Zone Lesson #4: 

The Blue Zones

9 Lessons For Living Longer

From the people who’ve lived the longest

by Dan Buettner

This is not meant to be a book review, but a chance to impart some great information that we all need to know.

“Life expectancy of an American born today averages 78.2 years. But this year, over 70,000 Americans have reached their 100 birthday.”

Dan Buettner teamed up with National Geographic to find the world’s longest-lived people and study them. They found pockets of people around the world with the highest life expectancy, or with the highest proportions of people to reach age 100.

The 5 places are:

Barbagia region of Sardinia-mountainous highlands

Ikaria, Greece-Aegean Island

Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica

Seventh Day Adventist-around Loma Linda, California

Okinawa, Japan-Island area.

They put together medical researchers, anthropologists,

Demographers, and epidemiologists to search for evidence-based common denominators. They found nine lifestyle and diet habits .

Here is the first Lifestyle habit:

1. Move Naturally.

“The world’s longest-lived people don’t pump iron, run marathons or join gyms. Instead, they live in environments that constantly nudge them into moving without thinking about it. They grow gardens and don’t have mechanical conveniences for house and yard work.”

How do I incorporate this into my life?

“Inconvenience Yourself”

“Have fun, Keep moving’

“Walk”

2. Purpose.

“The Okinawans call it ‘Ikigai’ and the Nicoyans call it ‘plan de vida;’for both it translates to ‘why I wake up in the morning.’ Knowing your sense of purpose is worth up to seven years of extra life expectancy.”

In his book, The author says to take time to see the big picture. For me, I know some days are going to not be pain free. Having a purpose helps me push the pain and strain aside.

#3. Down shift

“Even people in the Blue Zones experience stress. Stress leads to chronic inflammation, associated with every major age-related disease. What the world’s longest-lived people have that we don’t are routines to shed that stress. Okinawans take a few moments each day to remember their ancestors, Adventists pray, Ikarians take a nap and Sardinians do happy hour.

#4. 80% Rule

“‘Hara hachi bu’ -the Okinawan, 2500-year old Confucian mantra said before meals reminds them to stop eating when their stomachs are 80% full. The 20% gap between not being hungry and feeling full could be the difference between losing weight or gaining it. People in the blue zones eat their smallest meal in the late afternoon or early evening and then they don’teat any more the rest of the day.

#5 is next time, don’t miss it.

Be Healthy,

Coach Brown

Lost Friend, Karma, Food Adventures, and Blue Zone Lifestyle #3

I have been blessed with some long-term friends. They have walked with me for 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60 years. It hurts when one of them is lost from this world. My friend Hans died. We have been friends since college, more than 50 years. My children have always called him Uncle Hans. We were teammates on a Championship football team and played in a Bowl game together.

2 Days to Game Time at the Rose Bowl

I have kept this photo of us on the field together all these years. We were the same height, same weight, similar strength, and speed at that time. Two undersized guys among giants. We were very competitive with each other and anyone else. He will be missed. Three thoughts come to mind with this event. 1.) Genes are rarely checked. 2.) There is no way to know about anyone’s karma. 3.) There is no way to measure my loss. If I live a long life, I will see friends move on.

Food & Exercise again. I have been tweaking my diet and finalizing my exercise program to fit my aging body. The diet was made up of my main meal 3/4 plant-based and 1/4 meat protein. It has been evolving to 2 or more days a week of having no meat, all plant-based. It is much easier than I anticipated. My Mediterranean-style diet has led me to enjoy a Greek salad. The tastiest one I have found, so far. is at a pizza place here in Vegas, Napoli Pizza & Restaurant.

Greek salad and veggie pizza

It has all the goodies including 3 kinds of olives and feta Cheese. It is delicious. Give the big Greek salad a try as a meal one day a week. My exercise program has been stepped up since my hiking misadventure. I have added more balance exercises to help me in that area. The core of the balance exercises comes from the Ataxia disease website.

Here is a link:

Here is a link to a good article about Blue Zone food: https://www.livestrong.com/article/13770794-longevity-foods/

Here is a link to really good Blog article on Brown Rice from an expert date March 17, 2022.

The Way To Get More Good Years.

The Blue Zone

 Information From The Book

The Blue Zones

9 Lessons For Living Longer

From the people who’ve lived the longest

by Dan Buettner

This is not meant to be a book review, but a chance to impart some great information that we all need to know.

“Life expectancy of an American born today averages 78.2 years. But this year, over 70,000 Americans have reached their 100 birthday.”

Dan Buettner teamed up with National Geographic to find the world’s longest-lived people and study them. They found pockets of people around the world with the highest life expectancy, or with the highest proportions of people to reach age 100.

The 5 places are:

Barbagia region of Sardinia-mountainous highlands

Ikaria, Greece-Aegean Island

Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica

Seventh Day Adventist-around Loma Linda, California

Okinawa, Japan-Island area.

They put together medical researchers, anthropologists,

Demographers, and epidemiologists to search for evidence-based common denominators. They found nine lifestyle and diet habits .

Here is the first Lifestyle habit:

1. Move Naturally.

“The world’s longest-lived people don’t pump iron, run marathons or join gyms. Instead, they live in environments that constantly nudge them into moving without thinking about it. They grow gardens and don’t have mechanical conveniences for house and yard work.”

How do I incorporate this into my life?

“Inconvenience Yourself”

“Have fun, Keep moving’

“Walk”

Do you want to add years to your life and life to your years? Start now with the first lifestyle practice and tell me how it makes you feel.

Lifestyle habit:

2. Purpose.

“The Okinawans call it ‘Ikigai’ and the Nicoyans call it ‘plan de vida;’for both it translates to ‘why I wake up in the morning.’ Knowing your sense of purpose is worth up to seven years of extra life expectancy.”

In his book, The author says to take time to see the big picture. For me, I know some days are going to not be pain free. Having a purpose helps me push the pain and strain aside.

#3. Down shift

“Even people in the Blue Zones experience stress. Stress leads to chronic inflammation, associated with every major age-related disease. What the world’s longest-lived people have that we don’t are routines to shed that stress. Okinawans take a few moments each day to remember their ancestors, Adventists pray, Ikarians take a nap and Sardinians do happy hour.

Lifestyle #4 next time, be sure and subscribe.

Be well, Coach Brown

My Day Hike affected by Sarcopenia or Calico Basin call for help.

Calico Basin is a beautiful area just east of Red Rock here in Las Vegas.

 Sarcopenia is defined as age-related muscle loss. It can begin as a 1 or 2% loss per year at age 35, however, after age 60, it is said to accelerate to 3% per year. Loss of muscle is loss of strength.

An ugly fact is that fast-twitch fibers leave at a faster pace than slow-twitch fibers, so you don’t just get weaker you also get slower.

What does that have to do with a day hike in Calico Basin? Lots.

Calico Basin is adjacent to Red Rock Canyon National Recreation Area. It is free and no reservation is required, unlike Red Rock. While exploring the parking lot I found a nice 2-mile loop desert hike. There were other hikers and rock climbers. It was a great short hike. As I exited, I came across a second parking area full of cars with lots more trails. It seemed much more popular based on the traffic and the number of trailheads. I made a note to return the next week and check them out.

The next Saturday I was there starting my hike at 9:30 am. The sign said 3.5-mile loop. No difficulty rating was posted so I figured I was fine. Lots of rock climbers were headed in with fall mattresses on their backs. They wandered off the trail here and there to shear-faced dilemmas of choice. I wandered on. At about 11/2 miles, another trail joined mine. It came from the distant highway. My trail markers soon disappeared but the path dropped into a dry riverbed so I wasn’t worried. After walking a little while a few people passed me going both directions (I’m a slow walker) and it’s a loop trail so that seemed right. There are 3 or 4 huge dry waterfalls to climb. I did what other hikers were doing. The river bed grew wider with heavy gravel and rock base, but the fellow hikers were gone. I knew I was walking around a small mountain and the backside return should be marked soon. I saw nothing so I kept walking. Around noon, I saw a couple, I asked them if they had done this trail before and if they knew the path out? They said yes to my questions and told me I had missed the trail out a ways back. They walked back with me and pointed up the side of the mountain, up a dry waterfall. They continued on the path I left. It was 1000’ up to the peak, which I reached at 1:30. I was now out of water and both quads and hamstrings were cramping. 30 more minutes across the peak and I found the down trail. It was 1000 feet vertical down, over 1 story boulders. I started down, but could not go on. I was gassed and not strong enough to continue.

I grabbed my phone and there was no service. I tried to think about what to do. I paced the rock. I prayed. I found a discarded water bottle with a swallow left. I drank it. Higher power or fate, a text came in. It was from a friend who had sent it in the morning, but there it was at 2 pm. He was home sick with covid-19. I texted back that I needed help.

As he was alerting Rescue for me, 3 experienced climbers came over the ridge. These 2 girls and a guy, guided me all the way down the 1000 foot canyon and now in the dark all the way to the parking lot. They talked on the phone to my friend and to Rescue so that they did not have to come at all. We walked out with the lights on our cell phones.

All these angles get my vote for the karma of the month. Thank you.

There are a lot of lessons in this event. Many hiking rules. The importance of maintaining my strength with regular workouts. I have returned to this area with an experienced friend and found many areas of mistakes for my improvement, so I don’t get in over my head again. Now I have completed the Loop trail correctly and it is still a tough terrain trail, but a beautiful hike.

The Blue Zone

 Information From The Book

The Blue Zones

9 Lessons For Living Longer

From the people who’ve lived the longest

by Dan Buettner

This is not meant to be a book review, but a chance to impart some great information that we all need to know.

“Life expectancy of an American born today averages 78.2 years. But this year, over 70,000 Americans have reached their 100 birthday.”

Dan Buettner teamed up with National Geographic to find the world’s longest-lived people and study them. They found pockets of people around the world with the highest life expectancy, or with the highest proportions of people to reach age 100.

The 5 places are:

Barbagia region of Sardinia-mountainous highlands

Ikaria, Greece-Aegean Island

Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica

Seventh Day Adventist-around Loma Linda, California

Okinawa, Japan-Island area.

They put together medical researchers, anthropologists,

Demographers, and epidemiologists to search for evidence-based common denominators. They found nine lifestyle and diet habits .

Here is the first one.

Lifestyle habit:

1. Move Naturally.

“The world’s longest-lived people don’t pump iron, run marathons or join gyms. Instead, they live in environments that constantly nudge them into moving without thinking about it. They grow gardens and don’t have mechanical conveniences for house and yard work.”

How do I incorporate this into my life?

“Inconvenience Yourself”

“Have fun, Keep moving’

“Walk”

Do you want to add years to your life and life to your years? Start now with the first lifestyle practice and tell me how it makes you feel.

Lifestyle habit:

2. Purpose.

“The Okinawans call it ‘Ikigai’ and the Nicoyans call it ‘plan de vida;’for both it translates to ‘why I wake up in the morning.’ Knowing your sense of purpose is worth up to seven years of extra life expectancy.”

In his book, The author says to take time to see the big picture. For me, I know some days are going to not be pain free. Having a purpose helps me push the pain and strain aside.

Lifestyle #3 next time, be sure and subscribe.

Be well, Coach Brown

Not So Fast & Time Restricted Eating

There is a lot of popular talk about the benefits of fasting. 

There is science backing up calorie restriction being able to slow the aging process and help to reset of bodily functions. One of my new year plans was to do a fast or a cleanse.

There are many types of fasts. The most promising looked like something called 5:2, that is 5 days feeding paired with 2 days fasting. I also liked the 16:8 plan which is daily 16 hours fasting paired with 8 hours feeding. This 16 hour fast includes your night’s sleep to make it simpler. After doing some research, I decided on a 5 day program. 2 days fasting and 3 days of veggies only (a  5 day plan). 

This turned out to be easier than I anticipated. The 2 days of fasting were really a liquid diet. These liquid days were under 500 calories per day. I consumed 1 cup of coffee, veggie broth, v-8, green tea, water, and a veggie protein shake each day. On days 3, 4, & 5, I added stir fry veggies and ½ a butternut squash or a sweet potato. That is under 1000 total calories per day. I thought there would be a loss of energy or the usual brain fog from no meat and no complex carbohydrates. I had experienced that on the previous fasting or cleanse adventures, but none of this occurred. Breaking a fast properly is important so I eased into my regular 1800 calories and 4 oz. portion of meat. 2 weeks after the fast, I’m holding at 196 pounds (the lightest I’ve been in 30 plus years) and I am looking forward to additional plunges’ into fasting and weight loss. 

Post Fast Meal

Another week went by and I got an illness of some kind. I believe that it was from exposure from my students. I monitored my temperature and blood pressure. I ended up putting myself back on the blood pressure meds as a safeguard as my BP was a little elevated.

I’ll continue to monitor  my BP. The fasting felt great and I’m planning another in the near future.

The Blue Zone Information From The Book

The Blue Zones

9 Lessons For Living Longer

From the people who’ve lived the longest

by Dan Buettner

This is not meant to be a book review, but a chance to impart some great information that we all need to know.

“Life expectancy of an American born today averages 78.2 years. But this year, over 70,000 Americans have reached their 100 birthday.”

Dan Buettner teamed up with National Geographic to find the world’s longest-lived people and study them. They found pockets of people around the world with the highest life expectancy, or with the highest proportions of people to reach age 100.

The 5 places are:

Barbagia region of Sardinia-mountainous highlands

Ikaria, Greece-Aegean Island

Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica

Seventh Day Adventist-around Loma Linda, California

Okinawa, Japan-Island area.

They put together medical researchers, anthropologists, demographers, and epidemiologists to search for evidence-based common denominators. They found nine lifestyle and diet habits .

Here is the first one. Move Naturally.

“The world’s longest-lived people don’t pump iron, run marathons or join gyms. Instead, they live in environments that constantly nudge them into moving without thinking about it. They grow gardens and don’t have mechanical conveniences for house and yard work.”

How do I incorporate this into my life?

“Inconvenience Yourself”; By inconveniencing yourself you can add more activity to your day.

“Have fun, Keep moving”; Make a list of activities you enjoy, do those.

“Walk”; Blue Zone peoples are walking around 5 miles a day, every day.

Do you want to add years to your life and life to your years? Start now with the first lifestyle practice and tell me how it makes you feel.

Next blog will include Lifestyle habit #2. 

Be healthy,

Coach Brown