Exercise, Nutrition, and Spirit. Opening Door number 3.

  1. The Power Nine of the Blue Zone.
  2. De-Stress to Survive.
  3. Colorado harvest.

Blue Zone Power 9

The Blue Zones

9 Lessons For Living Longer

From the people who’ve lived the longest

by Dan Buettner

This is not meant to be a book review, but a chance to impart some great information that we all need to know.

“Life expectancy of an American born today averages 78.2 years. But this year, over 70,000 Americans have reached their 100 birthday.”

Dan Buettner teamed up with National Geographic to find the world’s longest-lived people and study them. They found pockets of people around the world with the highest life expectancy, or with the highest proportions of people to reach age 100.

The 5 places are:

Barbagia region of Sardinia-mountainous highlands

Ikaria, Greece-Aegean Island

Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica

Seventh Day Adventist-around Loma Linda, California

Okinawa, Japan-Island area.

They put together medical researchers, anthropologists,

Demographers, and epidemiologists to search for evidence-based common denominators. They found nine lifestyle and diet habits .

Here are Lifestyle habits:

1. Move Naturally.

“The world’s longest-lived people don’t pump iron, run marathons or join gyms. Instead, they live in environments that constantly nudge them into moving without thinking about it. They grow gardens and don’t have mechanical conveniences for house and yard work.”

How do I incorporate this into my life?

“Inconvenience Yourself”

“Have fun, Keep moving’

“Walk”

2. Purpose.

“The Okinawans call it ‘Ikigai’ and the Nicoyans call it ‘plan de vida;’for both it translates to ‘why I wake up in the morning.’ Knowing your sense of purpose is worth up to seven years of extra life expectancy.”

In his book, The author says to take time to see the big picture. For me, I know some days are going to not be pain free. Having a purpose helps me push the pain and strain aside.

#3. Down shift

“Even people in the Blue Zones experience stress. Stress leads to chronic inflammation, associated with every major age-related disease. What the world’s longest-lived people have that we don’t are routines to shed that stress. Okinawans take a few moments each day to remember their ancestors, Adventists pray, Ikarians take a nap and Sardinians do happy hour.”

#4. 80% Rule

“‘Hara hachi bu’ -the Okinawan, 2500-year old Confucian mantra said before meals reminds them to stop eating when their stomachs are 80% full. The 20% gap between not being hungry and feeling full could be the difference between losing weight or gaining it. People in the blue zones eat their smallest meal in the late afternoon or early evening and then they don’t eat any more the rest of the day.”

#5. Plant Slant

“Beans, including fava, black, soy and lentils, are the cornerstone of most centenarian diets. Meat–mostly pork–is eaten on average only five times per month. Serving sizes are 3-4 oz., about the size of a deck of cards.”

#6. Wine @ 5

“People in all blue zones (except Adventists) drink alcohol moderately and regularly. Moderate drinkers outlive non-drinkers. The trick is to drink 1-2 glasses per day (preferably Sardinian Cannonau wine), with friends and/or with food. And no, you can’t save up all week and have 14 drinks on Saturday.”

7. RIGHT TRIBE

The world’s longest-lived people are either born into or choose to create social circles that support healthy behaviors. Ikarians enjoy tight-knit communities that socialize frequently, while Okinawans build “moai” groups of five friends that commit to each other for life.

Research from the Framingham Studies shows that smoking, obesity, happiness and even loneliness are contagious. Assessing who you hang out with, and then proactively surrounding yourself with the right friends, will do more to add years to your life than just about anything else.

8. BELONG

All but five of the 263 centenarians interviewed in the original Blue Zones areas studies belonged to some faith-based community. Belong to a civic- or faith-based organization, since strong social relationships can add years to your life.

If you already belong to a group, great! If it’s been a while or you aren’t sure where to start, try asking friends and neighbors for their suggestions or search for additional information online.

9. LOVED ONES FIRST

Happy, healthy centenarians in the Blue Zones areas put their families first. This can take shape in many ways, from keeping your aging parents and grandparents in or near your home to being in a positive, committed relationship, which can add up to 6 years of life expectancy.

These are all from the Blue Zone website and you can check out more information there.

http://www.bluezones.com or the book is a good read with lots of indepth interviews.

Exercise, Nutrition/Diet, and (Door #3) SLEEP and STRESS

What I see in the Blue Zone Study is a reference to a lot more than diet and exercise. Here is a link to some solid information for our consideration:

In the Summer, the Colorado garden was a fine activity.

Here is a final Snapshot synopsis.

“Never doubt that God will bring a harvest of joy, no matter how dark the days you’re facing now.” Emmet Fox

Be Healthy,

Coach Brown

1 thought on “Exercise, Nutrition, and Spirit. Opening Door number 3.”

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